Motion to Dismiss Filed in Dalia Dippolito Alleged Murder for Hire Trial Reviewed by Momizat on . FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Valerie Allen Public Relations info@Valerieallenpr.com 310-382-7800 MOTION TO DISMISS FILED IN DALIA DIPPOLITO ALLEGED MURDER FOR FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Valerie Allen Public Relations info@Valerieallenpr.com 310-382-7800 MOTION TO DISMISS FILED IN DALIA DIPPOLITO ALLEGED MURDER FOR Rating: 0
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Motion to Dismiss Filed in Dalia Dippolito Alleged Murder for Hire Trial

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Valerie Allen Public Relations
info@Valerieallenpr.com
310-382-7800

MOTION TO DISMISS FILED IN DALIA DIPPOLITO
ALLEGED MURDER FOR HIRE TRIAL

Palm Beach, Fla., Nov. 17 — The sensational south Florida alleged murder for hire case that captured international attention in 2009 and 2011 has been revived by renowned criminal defense attorneys Brian Claypool and Mark Eiglarsh who have taken over the retrial of Dalia Dippolito.
Claypool took the lead in preparing an extensive motion to dismiss all charges against Ms. Dippolito based on objective entrapment that was filed today in Palm Beach County. This doctrine, which is recognized by Courts in Florida, focuses not on the predisposition of the suspect, but rather on police misconduct. Claypool outlines in great detail a pattern of law enforcement deceit and misconduct that violated the substantive due process rights of Ms. Dippolito as set forth in the Florida Constitution.

After reviewing thousands of pages of trial transcripts and deposition testimony, and after finally procuring the Boynton Beach Police Department policies and procedures manual, Claypool was able to establish countless stunning instances of police misconduct, including coercing the undercover informant, falsifying police reports, destroying records and enticing Ms. Dippolito.

Ms. Dippolito was arrested in August 2009 after she allegedly hired an undercover police officer who was posing as a hit man to kill her husband, Michael Dippolito. Police then staged a crime scene and recorded her reaction on the day the murder was supposed to take place. On May 13, 2012, she was convicted of solicitation to commit first-degree murder. Then, at Ms. Dippolito’s sentencing hearing held on June 17, 2011 she was sentenced to 20 years.

In August 2014 the Fourth District Court of Appeal reversed the conviction and tossed out the 20-year sentence. The appellate court deemed that the trial court erred by denying Ms. Dippolito’s request to individually question prospective jurors about their exposure to pretrial publicity about her case and denying her request to strike the entire jury pool after all the jurors heard an allegation that Ms. Dippolito had attempted to poison her husband; a false accusation that was not admitted at trial. The appellate court determined that potential jurors should have been questioned individually “once it became apparent that a multitude” of them “had been exposed to pretrial publicity.”

Claypool, a criminal defense attorney and civil rights attorney who has appeared in the media extensively as a legal analyist, is available for interview to discuss the stunning new twist in the Dalia Dippolito saga.
More About Brian Claypool: http://claypoollawfirm.com

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